brand
New York
212-421-5500
New Jersey
201-429-7892
Se Habla Español
As the situation with the COVID-19 virus continues, we want you to know that we are available to our clients. We are conducting phone and via conferencing meetings. We are open and will continue to represent you in these uncertain times. Do not hesitate to contact us with any questions, concerns or requests for information.

Medical Malpractice
Attorneys And Trained Medical
Professionals

Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.

Medical Malpractice
Attorneys And Trained
Medical
Professionals

Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.
  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. Surgical Errors
  4.  » Artificial intelligence could help surgeons reduce errors

Artificial intelligence could help surgeons reduce errors

On Behalf of | Nov 30, 2020 | Surgical Errors

Mistakes on the job will happen — but some jobs don’t leave much room for error. Surgeons, for example, always need to be on top of their game. A single careless slip can be a disaster for their patient.

Is there such a thing as a perfect surgeon?

People may tell you that someone is a great surgeon, but what do they mean, and how do they know? The fact that someone has performed several complicated operations without harming anyone in the process is no guarantee they will do the same for you. There are over 4,000 surgical errors every year in the United States, so as good as most surgeons may be, they do not get it right all the time. They are human, after all.

Could AI make the difference in surgical care?

Thankfully the future of the world does not rely on humans alone. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and other kinds of technology are making significant inroads across the spectrum. Rather than replacing surgeons, there are various teams developing ways it can help surgeons.

Researchers from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are working on a system that uses AI, neuromodulation and neuroimaging to step inside surgeons’ brains when they are operating. By measuring how their brain and nerves react to specific situations, it will give medical authorities a better understanding of their strengths and weaknesses. The idea is not to grade them but to develop personalized training to help each surgeon improve.

There’s no guarantee that a surgeon will get everything right

Seek legal advice if you or someone in your family suffered from a surgical error. An attorney can evaluate your case and see if you have grounds to file a medical malpractice claim.