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Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.

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Medical
Professionals

Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.
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What is a silent stroke?

| Jan 25, 2021 | Medical Malpractice

Many people know some of the more common signs of strokes, but what they don’t realize is that they can have a silent stroke. This type of stroke doesn’t have any symptoms at the time of the stroke, but patients will usually have symptoms later. These often aren’t diagnosed until the patient has a brain scan that shows the damage.

One troubling issue with a silent stroke is that it’s often impossible to realize what happened right away. Either you don’t remember that you had signs of a stroke or you didn’t have any immediate signs at all. After the stroke, you might notice problems like memory troubles or problems with thinking. You should report those symptoms to your doctor.

How common is a silent stroke?

Silent strokes are a bit more common than most people realize. Around 10% of people who were considered middle-aged were found to have brain damage from a silent stroke. That study noted that these people didn’t have signs of having a stroke. 

Can you do anything about the loss of abilities after a silent stroke?

Because the brain changes that are present are permanent, you can’t reverse them. Instead, you may be able to undergo therapy to train other parts of your brain. This can lead to you regaining some function that you may have lost, but you might not regain it all. Some patients also need to make lifestyle changes, and some may need medication management to prevent another stroke in the future. 

Even though this is considered a silent stroke, you should be able to count on your doctor to realize something is amiss when you report the current symptoms you’re having when you visit the doctor after the stroke. If they fail to recognize the signs during the visit after the stroke and don’t make a diagnosis, the outcome for your health can be significant. You may miss a chance for recovery, and you may miss the chance to take medication or make lifestyle changes that will prevent more problems. 

If you were misdiagnosed or had the symptoms of a stroke dismissed, you may have the right to compensation for your losses. An attorney can tell you more.