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Medical Malpractice
Attorneys And Trained Medical
Professionals

Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.

Medical Malpractice
Attorneys And Trained
Medical
Professionals

Trust our firm to deliver exceptional client service no matter how complex your medical malpractice case is.

Can you help avoid being the victim of a medication error?

On Behalf of | Aug 23, 2022 | Medication Errors

As a patient, you expect doctors to prescribe you the correct drugs in the correct dosages. If you are in the hospital, you expect them to administer them correctly. Expecting them to do that is fine. That is what they are trained and paid for, after all. Assuming they will is another thing altogether.

Medical professionals make drug errors all the time and those mistakes can have grave consequences for affected patients. Your life and health are too precious to assume someone will do what they should. Here are some ways to make sure you get the right drugs

Tell your doctor what else you are taking

The list of drugs you’re taking should be in your medical record. However, you cannot rely on that nor assume the doctor will read it in full. Ask them straight out, “Can I still take this drug when I am already taking that one?”

Do some research

Doctors do not know everything. That is why you see them consulting physical or online guides about illnesses and drugs. Doing that yourself makes it more likely you notice if the doctor diagnoses the wrong drug.

Check out unfamiliar names

Many drugs come under various names. For example, there may be name brands and generic brands. Double-check to see that the unfamiliar name really is a substitute for what the doctor says it is.

Those steps reduce the chance you end up harmed due to someone prescribing or giving you the wrong drugs. Yet it might still happen. If it does, remember they are the medical professionals, and it was their responsibility — not yours — to get it right. Seek legal guidance to see if you have a medical malpractice case.